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First steps in exploring the diverse world of Fungi: A brief review of the Introduction to Fungi ID Course @ Feed Bristol – By Jessica Addison

I was lucky enough to be awarded a sponsored place on the Intro to Fungi ID course at the beautiful Feed Bristol site on 24th and 25th November last year. Thanks to ecologist friends, my eyes have been gradually opened to the amazing world of fungi and I have begun to develop a real interest… Continue reading First steps in exploring the diverse world of Fungi: A brief review of the Introduction to Fungi ID Course @ Feed Bristol – By Jessica Addison

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Tips to capturing the beauty of winter with wildlife photographer Paul Collins

In the first photo masterclass for Bristol Nature Network, we're tackling the subject of Winter. In between the glowing hues of autumn and the vibrant blooms of spring, winter brings its own kind of subtle beauty. Frost-covered fields, intense sunrises and serene mists over glassy lakes are all cause for celebration. By watching the season… Continue reading Tips to capturing the beauty of winter with wildlife photographer Paul Collins

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What to expect as a BNN Committee member by Sarah Watt

"If I could continue my role as events secretary on the Bristol Nature network committee from overseas, I would not be reluctantly writing this ‘farewell’ blog. However, as reluctant as I am, I am also excited to hand over this role to the next member, as I know they will be joining a network of… Continue reading What to expect as a BNN Committee member by Sarah Watt

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Five simple ways to help your adult get into the wild

Stuff I Talk About

“We need to reconnect children with nature!”, sound the cries of environmental organisations. Our children are suffering from nature deficit disorder, they’ve lost the right to roam, they have too much screen time. Charities such as the National Trust and the movement Project Wild Thing have both been working hard over the past few years to reverse these trends.

But what about us? I argue that it is perhaps those in their 20s and 30s who are our vital audience. Most of us are yet to have children, some of us may not ever have a family. We don’t have the excuse to go to the park. Many of us have been hauling ourselves up a career ladder where the rungs have been kicked out due to the “economic climate”. We’re earning to pay rent to someone else to live in houses we’re barely present in, all because we…

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